The Sagari project,
a commitment to protecting biodiversity

Repsol has applied the highest
safety and environmental
protection standards
to alleviate the impact
on the Sagari execution area

Proyecto Sagari

We currently have over 45 people in the field. Peruvian biologists, specializing in all areas, have taken part. However, we cannot cast aside how local collaborators from nearby communities have supported Repsol. Without them, this important work wouldn't have been possible, given the vital knowledge that they share with us

Nadiua Sanchez,
Director of Environmental
Studies at Walsh Peru

In 2017, Repsol started gas production in the Sagari field in Peru The project has posed a challenge for the Repsol team because of technical difficulties and the necessary logistics of reaching such remote areas of the Peruvian rain forest.

The Sagari field is located in low Urubamba, one of the least-explored areas of Peru and which also has the greatest biological biodiversity. It is home to various native communities and thousands of animal and plant species.

For Alex Rivadeneira, Safety and Environment manager, the priority of the project was clear from the very first day: “It is important to Repsol that we incorporate measures for environmental control and prevention as well as conservation of biodiversity into our project development, as as is the case with the Sagari project. This is why we have incorporated best practices in environmental management from the first day of the project. These measures enable us to preserve and conserve the biodiversity of the area we are working in."

Training the team members working on this project was fundamental to meeting this objective, which is why we invested more than 1,500 man hours in educating them on aspects of biodiversity. In addition, we had a team of over 45 biologists specializing in all areas in charge of overseeing the project and taking action to preserve the flora and fauna in the area.

The participation of members of native communities has been fundamental in carrying out this conservation work in such a remote area as the Amazon rain forest in Peru, as Nadia Sanchez, Director of Environmental Studies at Walsh Peru, states: "We have managed over 45 people in the field. Peruvian biologists, specializing in all areas, have taken part. However, we cannot cast aside how local collaborators from nearby communities have supported Repsol. Without them, this important work wouldn't have been possible, given the vital knowledge that they share with us."

Thanks to the work of the teams involved, more than 5,500 orchids and bromeliads have been relocated from the trees that were in the construction area. Over the next few years we will continue to monitor them, to ensure the preservation of these plants. Also, we built seven bridges to connect tree tops and make it easier for animals in this area of the field to move around.

The project is an example of Repsol's commitment to the areas we working in with responsibility and integrity. All of this has been a success thanks to the effort and skill of our team.